Making Milk Kefir

Finished Product

Finished Product


(Edited 7/2/2014)

I wish I could say making milk kefir was a hard, complicated, art form so you’d be really impressed.

But it’s not.

Maybe it should be our secret. We’ll let the world think we’re doing this amazingly complicated thing…but we’re not. Oh, well.

What is Milk Kefir?

What is milk kefir, you ask? Milk kefir is AMAZING. It is an energizing, filling, tummy-taming beverage that packs a probiotic punch. Kefir means “feel good” – and it is true for me- I feel good -not bloated or lethargic but energetic and healthy after drinking milk kefir. I miss it when I run out.

Taste-wise, milk kefir is a tangy – slightly sour, slightly fizzy drink made from a symbiotic culture of yeast and bacteria, called (drum roll) – kefir grains. You can’t grow kefir grains or make them. You have to purchase them from a reputable online source or get some from a kefir-drinking friend. Once you have your grains they will multiply slowly with each batch.
Now for the instructions.

Milk Kefir

  • Servings: 1 quart
  • Time: 5 min prep, 12-48 hr culture
  • Difficulty: easy
  • Print
  • Place a tablespoon (at least) of keifer grains in the bottom of a clean, glass quart jar. (kefir does not like metal)
  • Fill with milk (fresh, raw,preferred).
  • Cover with a tea towel. Stir every once in a while with a wooden spoon, if you like.
  • Come back in 24 – 48 hours to milk keifer.

That is IT.  Really easy.

Tips and such:

1. Temp matters. Try keep the milk around “room temperature” if you can. During the summer or by your crock-pot (oops) kefir can culture very quickly, 12 hours or less even. Keep an eye on it for separating of whey. When kefir is slightly thick (about like real maple syrup consistency) and the grains have spread over the top of the milk. It is done.

Don’t worry if you let the kefir go too long. The flavor is stronger but it is fine to eat. You could make kefir cheese!

2. Your initial culture can take up to 48 hours if you received your grain via mail. Follow the instructions you get with your grains. Once established it really should be as easy as pour the milk and cover and wait.

3.  Enjoy the process. Learning how to ferment food is fun and delicious.

 

What do I do with kefir?

SMOOTHIES!!!! Kefir is almost exclusively our smoothie base. I will occasionally sip it plain but we love it so much for smoothies that it’s kind of reserved for that.

You can add fruit and do a second ferment but I keep it simple. Why mess with perfection any way?
Enjoy 🙂Image

 

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4 thoughts on “Making Milk Kefir

  1. I’ve heard that about kefir recipes, to use a Tbsp. per quart… I only keep less than a tsp. (1 to 5 grains) per quart, and it takes 18 hours at room temp to thicken. I’ve found the less # of grains, the sweeter the kefir. I think there are different milk kefir grains, perhaps, because I’ve had two different sources for grains and one was much sweeter than the other.
    My favorite unusual use for kefir is to drain it and add coconut and maple syrup for a healthy topping for cake!

    Like

    • What a creative use of kefir! I have not heard that tip of using less before. I may try that. Do use raw or pasteurised milk. I have noticed a big difference between the two. Thanks for stopping by!

      Like

      • Ahh, that could be the difference! I have only ever used RAW milk…. Our milk is so thick, my mom doesn’t even use cream for cream pies, she just uses milk!! So, that could be why I get stellar results with just a tiny bit of kefir grains. Sometimes I forget that not everyone has a Jersey milk cow in their back yard. LOL

        Like

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